Jasper Kettner

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Holocene Mon Amour

No. 2 (garbage, debris)

Holocene Mon Amour

No. 4 (radioactive sludge)

Holocene Mon Amour

No. 1 (garbage)

Holocene Mon Amour

No. 6 (acid resin)

Holocene Mon Amour

No. 3 (debris)

Holocene Mon Amour

No. 5 (arsenic mine waste)

No one knows exactly how long it would take for Earth to fully recover from humanity. In the opposite extreme, we quickly talk of new paradises and oases of nature shortly after greening a mountain of rubbish, the remediation of former uranium mining heaps, or the renaturation of former sewage rivers. The trivialization of the destruction through language testifies to the inability to deal with it, as well as to the notion of a pre-human condition in the Holocene. The construction of new landscape is the construction of our vision of untouched nature foremost. A completely unattainable vision in times of changed CO2 content in the atmosphere. Language and fabricated nature cover up the collective trauma of environmental destruction. They soften the permanent dialectic of wilderness and destruction that marks the perception of nature like a scar.

Holocene Mon Amour presents the most beautiful of these new landscapes.